take-action-header

Email Your Representative to Oppose the Homeowner Flood Insurance Affordability Act of 2013 (H.R. 3370)

On January 30, the Senate voted 67-32 to pass a bill that would delay reforms enacted to place the National Flood Insurance Program on a sounder footing. The House will take up a similar version of this legislation (H.R. 3370) on Wednesday.

The Homeowner Flood Insurance Affordability Act of 2013 (H.R. 3370) goes further than the Senate bill by completely stopping implementation of certain provisions of the Biggert-Waters Flood Insurance Act of 2012, rather than simply delaying them for four years.  This House bill forces taxpayers to continue subsidizing high-risk development of flood-prone areas and sets a terrible precedent of never letting positive reform take effect.

Use POPVOX to email your Representative to oppose the allow the Homeowner Flood Insurance Affordability Act of 2013 (H.R. 3370) and allow actuarially accurate premiums to take effect in the interest of taking steps toward returning the entire flood insurance program to the private sector.

Suggested Tweets
Email Your Representative to Oppose the Homeowner Flood Insurance Affordability Act of 2013 (H.R. 3370)

Tweet This

House bill forces taxpayers to continue subsidizing high-risk development of flood-prone areas #HR3370

Tweet This

Delaying needed reforms soaks the taxpayers #HR3370 #HAction #FloodInsurance

Tweet This

Please Share Your Thoughts

6 thoughts on “Email Your Representative to Oppose the Homeowner Flood Insurance Affordability Act of 2013 (H.R. 3370)

  1. What’s the problem? It’s the American dream to build a house below sea level, along a river that’s prone to flooding, and on a beach that gets hurricanes several times a decade, then expect my fellow citizens to bail me out of bad decisions when things go bad.

    • So you are ok that people who played by the rules and built a home to comply with rules will now be punished with significantly higher premiums because the government wants to change the rules. Any solution must include provisions to grandfather in existing properties that complied with the rules when it was built. New rules can be applied to new construction.

      • Ok.. Higher premiums for any property owner that makes capitol improvements to any property determined to be in a designated flood plane. Sounds fair. I always check flood plane information prior to purchasing my properties. It’s a simple formula. Make bad decisions, pay the price if something goes wrong. My expectation that I will bailed out by my fellow citizens even though I know I’m putting my primary/vaction home on a beach that suffers from chronic beach erosion every winter smacks of selfishness. Do I need to bail out a multi millionaire on Malibu? Ehhhhhh, sorry. Living by the addage “if you’re gonna play, you gotta pay.”

  2. People with beachfront property have their OWN insurance, and they likely paid cash for it. FEMA insurance only goes up to $250,000 of coverage. What few understand is this impacts low and middle income people the MOST, and the FEMA maps are based on inaccurate map data. The house I live is in zone AE (100 year flood plain) is only worth $150k yet I’ve seen my flood insurance rate go up to $300 a mth. If fully enacted, it could go up to $2,000 a mth. That’s insane. I couldn’t afford that nor would anyone want to purchase the property. This only proves that anything the government gets involved in (healthcare, student loan programs, flood insurance, etc.) gets screwed up royally.

  3. Pingback: Property Owners Get a Reprieve From Rising Flood Insurance Costs

  4. Pingback: Property Owners Get a Reprieve From Rising Flood Insurance Costs

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *