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The Truth About Health Care Premiums Under Obamacare

Last modified on 2014-06-16 18:43:02 GMT. 0 comments. Top.

They say it’s better to ask forgiveness than permission.  Well, with the passage of Obamacare, the left didn’t really ask for permission or forgiveness.  They just made lots of promises they didn’t intend to keep, and then the kind of acknowledged that maybe they overstated the benefits of the Affordable Care Act.  To them, it’s still awesome and “beautiful.”

If you’re still wondering whether Obamacare has lowered health care premiums, Chris Jacobs has the scoop in his latest WSJ Think Tank blog post:

[D]uring the 2008 presidential campaign, Barack Obama promised on numerous occasions that his plan would “cut costs” and “lower your premiums” by $2,500 per year for the average family. Ironically, the foundation for Mr. Obama’s promises rests in a memo released by three consultants to the 2008 campaign—one of whom, David Blumenthal, now heads the Commonwealth Fund.

Since the law was enacted, Commonwealth and other supporters, while saying that Obamacare would mitigate premium increases, have largely failed to address the earlier promise that the law would reduce them outright. Another author of the 2008 memo, David Cutler, said in 2012 that, in retrospect, Mr. Obama made “occasional misstatements” when pledging that premiums would fall by $2,500 annually. In August 2012, PolitiFact rated that premiums pledge a “promise broken.”

Supporters of the law started out saying that Obamacare would reduce premiums in absolute terms. Now, backers say that the law will lower premium increases relative to what they would have been without the law—a tougher metric to quantify and a more difficult measure of success to sell politically. This is another example of how in Washington, where one stands on an issue frequently depends upon where one sits.