Restore the Traditional Doctor-Patient Relationship

America is blessed with the most qualified and talented doctors in the world. Sadly, Obamacare and growing government interference in the practice of medicine at the federal and state level, combined with intrusive third party payment rules and a broken medical liability system undermine physician independence, limit patient choice, harm the integrity of the medical profession, and weaken the traditional doctor-patient relationship.

Obamacare, as well as federal and state health policy are also contributing to an economic concentration of power in the health insurance markets, a decline in competitiveness and a reduction in health care options for physicians and their patients. The Obamacare promise that you can keep your doctor has not been kept. When patients have to start anew with a different provider, the bond of trust must be rebuilt.

In certain states, high malpractice insurance premiums and punitive awards have discouraged physician participation, and thus contributed to serious problems for patients in accessing care, particularly specialized care.

Public policy should strengthen the doctor-patient relationship by empowering doctors and patients to make important healthcare decisions according to what is best for the patient. In order to accomplish this, several things are needed:

One, promote patient-centered financial arrangements. Patients should have ownership of their health care resources and be allowed to enter into direct financial arrangements with their doctor of choice, in order to maximize their control over their health care decisions.

Two, enact meaningful medical liability reform. All states should enact meaningful medical liability reform in order to preserve access to care, reduce unnecessary spending on defensive medicine and remove this potential wedge between patients and doctors.

If these reforms are implemented, private medical practice will flourish, the quality of care will improve, costs will decline, clinical innovation will increase and the doctor-patient relationship will be preserved.


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