We Can Do Better

On Friday, the House passed and then the Senate defeated Speaker Boehner’s plan to increase the debt ceiling.  On The Hill’s Congress Blog, Heritage Action’s CEO Michael Needham offered the following:

We have seen the conservative movement, which had been unified in enthusiastically supporting the Ryan budget and Cut, Cap and Balance Act, splinter as some good conservatives support the Boehner plan and others oppose it. We have seen members of Congress attack each other and their staffs. We have seen aggressive whip tactics on the House floor, which bring back memories of the DeLay Congress which lost the trust of the conservative grassroots.

All for what?

Read the rest…

Please Share Your Thoughts

3 thoughts on “We Can Do Better

  1. Great article! And even Cut, Cap and Balance was a compromise for the grassroots base. Congressman Paul Broun, myself, Michelle Bachmann and others voted no on it because it raised the debt limit as well as did not address Obamacare. And now I have heard on the Eric Erickson radio show tonight that this Boehner bill may also be having some Obamacare in it! This is not what we hired the 2010 winning congressman, nor even Boehner (who I supported) to do! I also had advocated in the last election for Mitch McConnel. I’m very disappointed in both of them as well as a lot of those who voted for this bad deal, not to mention the conservative media who joined in on trashing true conservatives!

    • Correction to my post: I intended to say that Bachmann, Broun, etc. voted no on the Cut, Cap and Balance, –both because it raised the debt ceiling, and Bachmann voted “No” because it did not Repeal Obamacare. I was also in favor of the “No” vote, due to it raising the debt ceiling and that it did not Repeal Obamacare. Cutting Obamacare, per the Roger Hedgcock radio show a few weeks ago, would cut 1-1/2 Trillion below the debt ceiling as well as cut 1-1/2 Trillion in pending Obamacare taxes.

  2. How China Ate America’s Lunch
    by Luc Vallee on 2011/07/29

    INTEL SOURCE LINK: (title unknown)

    http://intelwars.com/2011/07/29/how-china-ate-americas-lunch/

    In response to one of my recent posts, #999999;”>The Sceptical Market Observer: A New Set of Crisis Villains, Clif Carothers sent me a very insightful and elaborate comment on the relative evolution of the economies of China and the United States over the last 35 years. He claims, very convincingly, that China has deliberately and successfully exploited Europe and America’s wealth to leverage its own development. Less a conspiracy than a brilliantly executed plan, the bottom line is that China’s strategy worked. The brilliant exposé below should be an eye opener for most.

    For those that say nothing can be done to right our ship of state because it was merely happenstance that placed China in the good fortunes of becoming the next great empire and not some nationalistic conspiracy that created China’s opportunity for preeminence, I would ask, did China’s leadership not conspire to achieve world fiscal dominance? Did America not conspire to achieve world military dominance? Did England not conspire to achieve world colonial dominance?

    Our founders wrote in the federalist papers of their concerns for the eventual collapse of our country when they expounded on why previous republics failed. In creating our newest form of Republic, they studied the failures of others stating that when elites were able to place puppet politicians in the functions of government, their republics failed. While our founders created a system of bicameral government, overlapping terms of the house, president, and senate, shared system of government between local, state, and federal systems, all designed to thwart the overtaking of government by the elite, but they failed to realize the concentration of power that capitalism would eventually afford our elite over our political system as the centuries progressed.

    China certainly had a strategy for mining America’s wealth but it could not have been exercised if not for the weak underbelly of our political system. That underbelly was the dependence of political leaders on the fortunes of business and banking for their re-elections. This was the incipient crack through which the corruption of our American Republic began, and it is this symbiotic poison that we must now severe if we wish to avoid being dashed against the historical rocks of other failed republics, some of which also were the world’s political giants of their time.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *