Driving the Day: Big-Government Status Quo

Yesterday, President Obama outlined his “plan to reduce the deficit.”  The speech was short on specifics and lacked the sort of bold, innovative thinking necessary to address our nation’s most pressing challenge – our massive federal debt.  President Obama blamed former President Bush, attacked Republicans, targeted small businesses, defended egregious spending and implied government should exert more control over our economy.

As ABC’s Jake Tapper pointed out, President Obama’s harsh criticism of the Republican budget proposal was somewhat surprisingly.  At a House Republican retreat in 2010, the President said:

We’re not going to be able to do anything about any of these entitlements if what we do is characterize whatever proposals are put out there as, ‘Well, you know, that’s — the other party’s being irresponsible. The other party is trying to hurt our senior citizens.’

Yesterday, the President did just that:

One vision has been championed by Republicans…This is a vision that says up to 50 million Americans have to lose their health insurance…Many are someone’s grandparents who wouldn’t be able afford nursing home care…

As we’ve said before, President Obama is fundamentally unserious.

Please Share Your Thoughts

2 thoughts on “Driving the Day: Big-Government Status Quo

  1. I thought the most interesting lines of his speech were “if we truly believe in a progressive vision of our society, we have the obligation to prove that we can afford our commitments. If we believe that government can make a difference in people’s lives, we have the obligation to prove that it works – by making government smarter, leaner and more effective.”
    He is saying he can’t prove that his way is the best way, and he said it after laying out a progressive vision. Interestingly this was quite similar to what Reagan said in his “A Time for Choosing” speech nearly 47 years ago: “So they’re [liberals] going to solve all the problems of human misery through government and government planning. Well, now, if government planning and welfare had the answer—and they’ve had almost 30 years of it—shouldn’t we expect government to read the score to us once in a while?”
    The liberal argument is bankrupt.

  2. I thought the most interesting lines of his speech were “if we truly believe in a progressive vision of our society, we have the obligation to prove that we can afford our commitments. If we believe that government can make a difference in people’s lives, we have the obligation to prove that it works – by making government smarter, leaner and more effective.”
    He is saying he can’t prove that his way is the best way, and he said it after laying out a progressive vision. Interestingly this was quite similar to what Reagan said in his “A Time for Choosing” speech nearly 47 years ago: “So they’re [liberals] going to solve all the problems of human misery through government and government planning. Well, now, if government planning and welfare had the answer—and they’ve had almost 30 years of it—shouldn’t we expect government to read the score to us once in a while?”
    The liberal argument is bankrupt.

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